Westworld’s Player Piano

Westworld’s player piano versions of 20th century rock hits went from delightful surprise to distracting gimmick to cultural phenomenon faster than Teddy getting killed in a shootout.

A full week after Westworld Episode 1 — “The Original,” first aired, Twitter was still exuberant over the discovery. Thousands of people all reported hearing “Black Hole Sun” or “Paint It Black” as if no one else had recognized the songs. Like Dr. Ford said, “They come back because they discover something they imagine no one had ever noticed before, something they fall in love with.”

Guys, this show is meta as fuck

But, beyond delighting fans who preferred freaking out over Radiohead over relishing the gorgeously poignant use of Shakespeare, John Donne, Arther Conan Doyle and Gertrude Stein, what was the deeper meaning behind the player piano tunes in the Sweetwater Saloon?

“All credit goes to showrunner Jonathan Nolan … he came up with that idea, and he was pushing those songs,” said Westworld composer Ramin Djawadi in an interview with Thrillist. “It’s been incredibly fun doing those arrangements on the piano in the saloon. It’s a little thing in the background that you might pick up on and then you think, ‘Hey, wait, that doesn’t belong there!’ It makes it contemporary and fun.”

Enter Stephen Kent

Nolan didn’t just pick some rock hits and ask for an orchestral version. Plenty of shows have done that. Instead, the Westworld team turned to Stephen Kent Goodman, of  Gnaw-Vol-ty Rolls.

Goodman builds actual reels for actual player pianos. You give him a song, and he produces a reel of paper with holes cut in it. That paper rolls through the piano, striking keys in the exact pattern to make the song you hear.

Is that DNA in the opening credits?

In Westworld, the player piano represents the first computers — the technological ancestor of the hosts. Like the hosts, it’s built to entertain the guests. And like the hosts, it is coded to imitate the actions of a human.

As Roger pointed out, “When you see the reel spin by in the opening credits, it looks a lot like DNA.”

Speaking of the opening credits, note the player piano being strung by robot arms. Next we see it being played by robot hands. Then it begins playing itself. We’re watching evolution. And this sequence tells us the singularity is inevitable.

Westworld’s link to Kurt Vonnegut

Although Nolan explains he’s just a Radiohead fan and thought 20th century songs would be a good reminder that we’re watching a 22nd century simulation of the 19th century, we’d like to think the player piano goes a step further, giving a deserved nod to Kurt Vonnegut’s dystopian novel of the same name.

Player Piano, published in 1952, tells us about an automated society where engineers and the rich create machines to do all the work while the poor have no purpose and live meaningless lives.

If Westworld is taking any direction from Vonnegut, and we desperately hope it is, the geography of the Westworld map makes perfect sense — as does the intensity of the guests’ experiences as they venture farther from Sweetwater.

“I want to stand as close to the edge as I can without going over,” Vonnegut writes in Player Piano.  “Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can’t see from the center. … Big, undreamed-of things — the people on the edge see them first.”


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Episode 2​ Chestnut Review

Westworld Episode 2 Chestnut Review

Time-shifting, barrel-swapping, nightmare-hacking and clumsy orgies top this week’s list of crackpot theories as Roger Roper, Dick Ebert and Gene Lyons plunge elbow-deep into this MRSA slit of mystery.

Episode 102 Chestnut brought fans more details on how guests arrive at the park, whether hosts dream, who’s banging whom and what it takes to get a knife in the hand. As the Man in Black continue his quests, fans begin narrowing their sites on his true identity. And as Maeve starts losing control, we get a dark look into what’s happening behind the scenes at Westworld.


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Episode 2 Chestnut Instant Take

Westworld Episode 2 Chestnut Instant Take

When HBO releases Westworld episode 2 early, so do we. Discover the significance behind how guests enter Westworld and how hosts prove their worth.

This special instacast is shorter than our usual episodes, and it explores the video-game nature of Westworld, how the virus spreads and what the Man in Black is really up to. Also, if you were trying to place the saloon music this time, it was Radiohead. No surprises there.


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Questions and Answers

Westworld Questions and Answers

Howdy…. If you’re like me, I know you’re asking… Why can’t the Westworld hosts kill humans? What’s the deal with milk and flies? Is that Soundgarden in the background? Is Anthony Hopkins a robot? What the hell is going on in the Westworld series debut?

You’ve got Westworld questions, and these guys got Westworld answers. Hosts Roger Roper and Dick Ebert saddle up with their new sidekick, Gene Lions, to explore the vast Westworld frontiers in search of justice and the ultimate truth behind Delos Destinations’ corporate motives. Westworld! Where the saloon girls are all 10’s and the rye whiskey is best served warm.

Subscribe today or Roger, Dick and Gene will be forced to drag you into old man Abernathy’s barn.


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Episode 1 The Original Review

Westworld Episode 1 The Original Review

“Why can’t the Westworld hosts kill humans? What’s the deal with milk and flies? Is that Soundgarden in the background? Is Dr. Ford a robot? What the hell is going on in the Westworld series debut?

You’ve got Westworld questions, and we’ve got Westworld answers. Hosts Roger Roper and Dick Ebert saddle up with their new sidekick, Gene Lyons, to explore the vast Westworld frontiers in search of justice and the ultimate truth behind Delos Destinations’ corporate motives.

Westworld! Where the saloon girls are all 10’s and the rye whiskey is best served warm. For $40,000 a day, we can all immerse ourselves in the lawlessness of the Old West. Westworld asks, how each of us would indulge our otherwise unspeakable appetites for senseless violence and transgressive sex, without moral scruple or legal consequence. The series is remarkably stark in its depiction of the cruelty underlying these appetites. All but vanished are the “shoot-out with a bandito” type scenarios of the campy 1973 movie. Instead, tourist’s regales in watching their artificial victims wriggle in the throes of death, only to want a souvenir photograph to take home. “Now, that’s what I call a vacation!.”


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